The Dillard Doctrine

Urban Conservative Commentary on Politics & Life

The Problem with Christian Politics

There’s an article in the recent edition of Newsweek entitled “The End of Christian America” that describes how less and less people are outwardly identifying themselves as Christian, and how that shift is affecting our national politics and culture. The author suggests that we are moving towards a “post-Christian” America, where religion-or specifically, the Christian religions-do not bring to bear the same influence they once did.

That may be true…but not for the reasons the author suggests. Christianity isn’t going away-the article say so itself-but its application to our politics could use a remaking, especially among the social conservatives that use Christian teachings as the backbone for their beliefs.

Where the Religious Right loses people (and this writing is limited to them, since I can’t put a clear definition on a “religious left”) is in their application of what they belief, and how they present those beliefs towards mainstream America.

In previous writings, I’ve said that the social conservative arm of the GOP can’t continue to damn everyone to hell that doesn’t want to fit in with their worldview…and that’s still true. You can’t condemn every single person who doesn’t agree with how you think the world should operate. First off, it’s not our place on earth to judge someone else (at least, that’s what my Bible says), so who am I to write you off if I don’t like or agree if how you want to live your life?

Another problem with Christian politics is that it seems to only limit its application to Christian beliefs. People fight like hell (yeah, I know, but he phrase fits) to protect the right to pray in schools and to support judges who want to put the Ten Commandments in their courtrooms. But what if a judge who is a practicing Muslim wants a phrase that references an aspect of sharia posted in his courtroom, or a group of Hindu high-schoolers want to lead a prayer in school one day? Do we, as Christians, have an obligation to protect the rights of those whose religious beliefs don’t line up with ours? I don’t know…but we definitely have that responsibility as Americans.

The final problem I see with Christian politics is that, to some degree, they’ve lost their relevance. Abortion’s no longer the issue it once was, yet when someone mentions the Religious Right, that-and gay marriage-are the primary things that come to mind.

As a friend of mine asked a while ago, why don’t social conservatives lend their weight towards issues like human trafficking and the global sex trade? There’s groups here and there that address these issues, but no one with the weight of a James Dobson or John Hagee have brought their resources to bear on those-or similar problems. What’s the Religious Right doing to stem the AIDS epidemic in Washington, DC, besides preaching a message of personal responsibility? It’s good to see churches offering classes in financial responsibility…but why aren’t those classes being taught where the people who need them the most are?

That’s my take. I don’t have a problem with religion intertwining with politics…as long as it’s not co-opted by a few.

HB2DF,

-Coby

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Written by Coby Dillard

April 6, 2009 at 3:10 pm

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  1. […] The Problem with Christian Politics « The Dillard Doctrine […]

  2. […] Coby Dillard added an interesting post on The Problem with Christian Politics « The Dillard DoctrineHere’s a small excerptThe author suggests that we are moving towards a “post-Christian” America, where religion-or specifically, the Christian religions-do not bring to bear the same influence they once did. That may be true…but not for the reasons the … […]

  3. The Problem With Christian Politics…

    Coby Dillard, a black conservative Republican blogger, discusses the Christian Right in America: “Where the Religious Right loses people (and this writing is limited to them, since I can’t put a clear definition on a ‘religious left’) is in their ap…

    Booker Rising

    April 15, 2009 at 10:25 pm


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